Cerrahpaşa Medical Journal
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Epidemiological, Clinical, and Prognostic Features of Infective Endocarditis: A Retrospective Study with 90 Episodes

1.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, American Hospital, İstanbul, Turkey

2.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, İstanbul University-Cerrahpaşa, Cerrahpaşa School of Medicine, İstanbul, Turkey

3.

Department of Cardiology, İstanbul University-Cerrahpaşa, Institute of Cardiology, İstanbul, Turkey

4.

Department of Internal Medicine, İstanbul Medipol University, Faculty of Medicine, İstanbul, Turkey

5.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, İstanbul Medipol University, Faculty of Medicine, İstanbul, Turkey

Cerrahpasa Med J 2021; 45: 107-115
DOI: 10.5152/cjm.2021.21008
Read: 341 Downloads: 178 Published: 09 August 2021

Objective: To evaluate the epidemiological, clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic features, as well as the prognosis and longterm outcome of patients with infective endocarditis.

Methods: The clinical records and follow-up data of 90 endocarditis episodes in 86 patients diagnosed with definite and possible infective endocarditis according to the modified Duke criteria in a tertiary university hospital, between 1998 and 2016, were reviewed.

Results: Fifty-six patients were male (65.1%), and the mean age was 49.9 ± 14.3. Native valve endocarditis constituted 62.2% of the cases, while the remaining patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The aortic (34.4%) and mitral (24.4%) valves were infected more frequently. Streptococci (27.7%) and staphylococci (24.4%) were the most frequently isolated microorganisms. Embolic complications (35.5%) were the leading cause of morbidity, followed by valve insufficiency (28.8%) and heart failure (21.1%). Valve replacement surgery was performed in 28 patients (31%). The in-hospital mortality rate was 15.1% (n = 13). Chronic renal failure (P = .042) and degenerative valves (P = .036) were significantly associated with mortality. Among 43 of the 73 cases available for telephonic survey, 36 (83.7%) patients were alive and without disease, with a median follow-up of 52.9 (4-163) months. Twenty-five (69.4%) of these patients were younger than 55 years, and 24 (66.6%) had native valve endocarditis.

Conclusion: Underlying cardiac conditions and chronic renal failure increase mortality in infective endocarditis, regardless of the pathogen. Long-term survival seems promising in cases with native valve endocarditis and in younger patients with low rates of comorbidities.

Cite this article as: Kaçmaz AB, Balkan İİ, Sinan ÜY, et al. Epidemiological, Clinical, and Prognostic Features of Infective Endocarditis: A Retrospective Study with 90 Episodes. Cerrahpaşa Med J. 2021;45(2):107-115.

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